Oriental rug

4 Tips to Keep Your Rug Looking Its Best

4 Tips to Keep Your Rug Looking Its Best

When you have your rug cleaned with us, your rug will look brand new when we return it to you. It will also smell better than ever before. The colors and patterns in the weave are brighter and more vibrant. And even better, is that it feels terrific under your feet. You’ll want to keep that new-like condition for as long as possible, although this might seem impossible with all of the activity it gets on a daily basis. So what can you do to help maintain that just-cleaned look and feel? Our experts have five pro tips to help keep your rug looking as good as new.

1. Keep shoes off of it

We put this tip as number 1 for a reason. We suggest that you make it a habit when removing your shoes when you walk in from the outside. There is no denying that shoes are hard on rugs. Think of all of the dirt and debris that comes in from your shoes. All of this gets down into the foundation of your rug.  When you wear shoes on your rug, you can wear them out much faster and diminish the color. By making your home a no-shoe zone and providing plenty of storage for shoes right by the front door, you will set an excellent example for children and guests by taking off your shoes as soon as you walk inside, too. This tip is so important we actually wrote an entirely separate blog about it. You can check it out here (10 Reason to take your shoes off in your home )

2. Give it a good beating

Your Grandma was right when she used to take the rug outside and beat it from the back. We’re not encouraging violence. However, your rug does need a thorough beating at least three times a year.

The reason for beating your rug from the back is to loosen up all of the dirt and debris from the fibers of the rug. You will then be able to vacuum the rug and get it cleaner because all of the dirt is loose now and therefore will be easily sucked up by the vacuum.  Our suggestion is to bring your smaller rugs out back and hang them on a clothesline or over a porch and give them a good beating from the back. If your rug is too big to move outside easily, it’s best to let a professional take care of the cleaning for you. We offer free pickup and delivery and will even move your furniture for you.

3. Turn it once a year

One of your rugs biggest enemies is fading, which is caused by too much time in the sun. Too much sun can cause your rug to look faded and washed out.  Fading is going to be inevitable for most rug owners unless you keep your curtains closed all of the time. The best thing is to ensure that the rug fades evenly. That way the colors are consistent all the way through, and there are no obvious fading spots. In order to achieve this,  you’ll want to rotate your rug once a year and allow it to fade naturally in the sunlight.

Oriental rug in the sun

4. Sprinkle it with baking soda

If you want to preserve that just-cleaned scent in your rug, then we suggest sprinkling some baking soda on it. This will help absorb odors, then all you have to do is vacuum them up. You can take this one step further by mixing in some herbs with your baking soda.  Combine the herbs and baking soda and let them sit for a few hours. Then, sprinkle the baking soda/herb mix on to your rug and let sit. Wait about two hours and vacuum up the mix. Any unpleasant odors will be gone, and the fresh herbal scent will be left behind!

Need to get your rug to the just-cleaned condition you love? Contact our rug cleaning team in Louisville to make an appointment. You can call us or contact us through our website to get started!

 

Schedule a Rug Cleaning

www.khazairugcleaning.com

LOUISVILLE, KY: 11300 Decimal Dr. Suite C Louisville, KY 40299

(502)327-1499

LEXINGTON, KY: 2051 Richmond Rd. Suite#125 Lexington, KY 40502

(859)272-4900

 

 

Ohio Valley & Spring Allergies

Ohio Valley & Spring Allergies

The average household has been shown to generate up to 40 pounds of dust per year! These contaminants can be harmful to health, especially for those who have asthma and/or Spring Allergies. Every year, the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America names the “Worst Cities in the United States for Spring Allergies.” : Louisville, KY made it into the top 5 every year and was #1 in 2014. 

 

Pollen forecast, spring allergies

 

Kentucky Bluegrass, spring allergies

Kentucky Bluegrass

There are other irritating, allergenic components we can fault about our locale—our vicinity to a stream bowl and the bowl-like structure of the Ohio Valley, our brown haze evaluations, and the dampness that hangs over us in the hotter months– for example. The impacts of environmental change likewise assume a part, as dust season in the spring and fall has extended up to a month over only a couple of years prior, and the climate is hotter earlier and later in the season.

Brown Haze in Louisville, KY, spring allergies

Brown Haze in Louisville, KY

The Foundation calculates rankings from examining the number of prescriptions filled for spring allergies and asthma medications, the quantity of allergists compared to population, as well the general level of pollen. Louisville will always be in the top 10 by this measure.

Some people think that moving to a different city will fix this problem. However, genetics also plays a factor, and those who move to other climes will usually develop environmental allergies in that area as well as time goes on.

Unfortunately, standard medical treatment such as prescription decongestants/inhalers, allergy shots and a healthy dose of prevention are the only proper defenses against spring allergies. So, the standard advice still applies. Don’t open your screen doors for air flow, as this brings pollens into the household.. Close your windows, decrease long periods being outdoors during high pollen times, and take a shower as soon as you come inside when you do.  Also, keep up to date on your prescription medicines and shots. And no matter how itchy your face gets, try to keep your hands away.

Pollen season may be miserable for allergy and asthma sufferers, it’s true. But, the pollen seasons are usually short and herald a sunny, hospitable summer or a cooler, scenic fall. It’s time to enjoy. Just know your limits!

Because your rug is your homes biggest air filter, you may want to bring it in to have it cleaned. Pollen and dust get trapped in your rug and if you don’t have it cleaned regularly, you are more likely to feel the effects of indoor pollutants.

 

Schedule a Rug Cleaning 

www.khazairugcleaning.com

LOUISVILLE, KY: 11300 Decimal Dr. Suite C Louisville, KY 40299

(502)327-1499

LEXINGTON, KY: 2051 Richmond Rd. Suite#125 Lexington, KY 40502

(859)272-4900

10 REASONS TO TAKE YOUR SHOES OFF IN YOUR HOME

10 REASONS TO TAKE YOUR SHOES OFF IN YOUR HOME

 

1. Cultural Background: Removing Shoes

Growing up, my neighbors were from Iran. In numerous nations like Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavian nations and so on, removing shoes is common practice, when entering somebody’s home. The custom of removing shoes is far-reaching likewise in Eastern countries like Japan, Korea, and Turkey.

In these nations, it is viewed as a violation of social norms to stroll through a house with shoes on. In a few schools in Sweden, kids are even required to remove their shoes

In Japan, taking off shoes has an incredibly reasonable issue. Customarily, the floors in Japanese residences were secured with tatami mats which are utilized to sit on and to sleep on rather than seats and beds. Wearing shoes into the house would bring the mud, soil, and microorganisms into the house and you would sit and rest in all that

Although hard flooring is prevalent in most Japanese homes nowadays, the tradition of removing your shoes continues.

I guess you could say that from a cultural perspective, it is a sign of respect to remove your shoes before entering the home.

Some people may get offended when asked to remove their shoes when entering a home.They feel they are being imposed upon, and this may be a level of intimacy that they are not comfortable with. Many people simply do not want to show their socks are feet because in their culture it is not common.

Their home was always immaculate. Especially their carpet and oriental rugs. I remember the first time I walked into their home. I immediately removed my shoes because it was apparent that they took great care of their carpets and rugs and I wanted to be respectful.

This custom stems back to antiquated circumstances when homes were constructed over the ground. The rise gave ventilation, additionally isolating the home from the ground. The demonstration of venturing up symbolized entering somebody’s private space. Visitors took off their shoes before venturing up to the primary house. Indeed, even today all through Asia you’ll find most homes with either stairs up to the main entrance or a little passage underneath the primary zone.

A considerable measure of the accentuation stems back to neatness. Shoes isolate your feet from the earth and grime outside. Wearing them in the home just tracks in the earth over the floor. In Asia, quite a bit of everyday life revolves around the floor. You’ll often see families sitting on the ground, visiting, eating dinner or sleeping.

What kind of home did you grow up in? Was it one of those homes where your mom was always yelling for you to take off your shoes?

Many Americans have made removing their shoes a habit. Many of others still go straight from outside to the couch without ever taking off their footwear. Although many view taking off your shoes is a cultural practice, you might want to consider it for health reasons.

 

 

2. Bacteria

A study by the shoe company “Rockport” at the University of Arizona found 9 different species of bacteria on people’s shoe soles.—this is bacteria that could bring about infections in the stomach, eyes, and lungs. Reoccuring contact with the fecal matter also meant shoes carry disgusting bacteria like E. coli. If you wear those same shoes in your home, the bacteria will likely spread amongst your living space.  It was found by researchers that over 90 percent of the time, bacteria on shoes transferred to the tile floors of a home. Rugs and carpets showed even worse results. Here are some common cleaning mistakes that will leave your home full of germs

We’ll go straight for the “gross-out” factor here: Your shoes are picking up bacteria all day long. The researchers found 421,000 units of bacteria on the outside of the shoe, including E. coli, meningitis, and diarrheal disease; Klebsiella pneumonia, a frequent source for wound and bloodstream infections as well as pneumonia; and Serratia ficaria, a rare cause of infections in the respiratory tract and wounds, reports Reuters.

(Rug under ultraviolet light)

3. Toxins

An examination by Baylor University in 2013 demonstrated individuals who live close to black-top streets fixed with coal tar had an expanded danger of growth from poisons as they were brought in to the home by their shoes. Furthermore, the Environmental Protection Agency said in Environmental Science and Technology demonstrated that herbicides which are unhealthy could be followed in the home from the base of our shoes.

The specialists found that the herbicide 2,4-D could be transported efficiently inside utilizing shoes for up to seven days after application. Also, that, as well as the “track-in” exposures of these chemicals may surpass those from buildups on non-natural crisp products of the soil. The investigation didn’t explain the wellbeing risk of the particular herbicide. However, the examination’s lead creator, Dr. Robert G. Lewis, said the potential exists.

Being exposed to 2,4-D can cause quick and minor issues like skin rashes and gastrointestinal surprises; long-haul wellbeing impacts of the herbicide are obscure, the EPA said. Another investigation showed that:

4. Feces Are Present On Almost 100% Of Shoes

Walking around your home in shoes could similarly also be the same as wiping crap everywhere on your floors. The reason? A University of Houston study found that coliforms, which are present in feces, are found on 96% of shoe soles. Furthermore, 39% contain C.diff, an anti-toxin safe microscopic organisms that cause the runs, and 27% include E. coli. More people are dying of C. diff in the United States than of HIV. If this alone doesn’t persuade you to remove your shoes, I don’t know what will.

5. Not everything carried in on your sneakers is invisible to the naked eye.

Outside elements can build up on your shoes and transport into your home. Although it may not be toxic, carrying in dirt isn’t ideal.  It is easy to remove your shoes and/or invest in a doormat to help keep your living space clean and tidy.

6. Shoe Soles Are Dirtier Than Toilet Seats

It may sound unimaginable, however, the base of your shoes contain a larger number of microbes than a normal toilet seat. As indicated by Jonathan Sexton, an exploration colleague at the University of Arizona’s College of Public Health, toilet seats, for the most part, have around 1,000 microorganisms or less, while the soles of shoes typically play hosts to millions. Furthermore, talking about restrooms, open restroom floors have been found to contain more than 2 million microbes for each square inch, and you can wager a ton of that winds up on your shoes each time you go into the restroom.

7.Wear and tear

Regardless of whether you have room schedule-wise to clean, the more you clean your rugs, the more you scour your mats the more wear and tear, which means the sooner you’ll have to replace said floor covers. Removing shoes means spending less cash on your floor. Likewise, despite the fact that the wear and tear on shoes themselves are usually negligible when inside, it’s still wear and tear.

8. Shoes pick up small particles of grit that cause wear and tear to carpets

Your Grandma was absolutely right when she use to take the rug outside and beat it from the back. Beating the rug from the back knocks out all of the fine dirt and particles that are trapped deep down in your rug. This is why you should never take your rugs to a carpet cleaner to be cleaned. In the eyes of a carpet cleaner, all floor coverings are the same. Carpet cleaners surface clean which ends up pushing all of the dirt and grit further down into the foundation. This can form a rough, sandpaper-like clay in your rugs foundation which over time causes damage.

(Fine dirt that came from a rug)

9.Neighbors

For urban inhabitants stacked upon each other in condo structures, for what reason must you torment the first floor occupants with the clop-clop-clop of your shoes? Not wearing shoes inside makes for cheerful neighbors.

10. Comfort and health

Unless you have a medical problem in which the help of shoes reduces torment, regardless of how agreeable your shoes are, your feet are likely more joyful outside of them. Freeing your paws from the shoes that quandary enables you to squirm your toes and recover some life into your feet. What’s more, internally, removing your shoes can flag the progress from the enormous outside to the unwinding shelter of your home.

Also, the chance to be shoeless is useful for your feet. Studies have demonstrated that youngsters who routinely abandon shoes have fewer instances of flat feet, and also having more grounded feet with better adaptability and less podiatric deformations. This allows your foot muscles to do their thing encourages them to remain stable and adaptable.

We know there will be individuals who would prefer not to see others’ feet and additionally the individuals who will always evade the shoeless way. How do you feel about going shoeless?

 

Schedule a Rug Cleaning 

www.khazairugcleaning.com

LOUISVILLE, KY: 11300 Decimal Dr. Suite C Louisville, KY 40299

(502)327-1499

LEXINGTON, KY: 2051 Richmond Rd. Suite#125 Lexington, KY 40502

(859)272-4900

 

What Makes A Masterpiece?

What Makes A Masterpiece?

What makes a masterpiece? If there were such a thing as a specific formula for creating one, then all artists would do so. Instead, a true masterpiece is the visual equivalent of capturing lightning in a bottle—a vector of time, place, genius and happenstance. Though they often look back to tradition, masterpieces become what they are by depicting something that hasn’t been seen before. There are no better examples than the ten famous paintings that follow, including some of the best Picasso paintings, works from Gustav Klimt and more. Wealthy buyers in the Persian Gulf and China have set a string of records as they have snapped up some of the world’s most important artworks in recent years.

Michelangelo's The Creation of Adam

Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam (c. 1512), part of the Sistine Chapel ceiling, is considered an archetypal masterpiece of painting

There’s no doubt that many people would agree that the majority of artwork found in museums and private collections around the world are priceless. Being one of a kind, it makes it difficult to put a price on many works; however, almost on a daily basis, art is sold and bought, oftentimes bringing hefty price tags that most will never be able to afford. We take a look at some of the artworks—from Old Masters to contemporary works—that no one can deny are some of the most expensive in the world.

The fine art market is booming: Seems like every day, another auction record is set for “the highest price ever paid [fill in artist’s name here].” So what does that mean for the painting you bought to match your sofa a few years back? It may increase in worth, or it may be as salable as your kid’s pasta-filled craft project. So how do you tell? Well, as with any investment, you need to do your research and go beyond your comfort zone. The art market is fickle, and there are no guarantees of profitability, but with a little legwork and forethought you can fill your home with images that may prove worthy assets down the line. Consider these tips for choosing fine art and identifying the Michelangelo from the macaroni. The rarity of a work of art is what gives it value, so an original will always be worth more than a reproduction.

A painting by Pablo Picasso entitled Women of Algiers set a new world record for the most expensive artwork to be sold at auction after reaching over $179m. Another example, a painting by Paul Gauguin was reportedly purchased for $300m, making it the most expensive painting ever sold, at auction or in a private sale. The Picasso painting was last sold in 1997 to a seller, who put it up for auction for $31.9m. The painting has therefore appreciated over $147m in the past 18 years.

Here is a list of the top ten most expensive paintings ever sold (2017)

top ten most expensive paintings ever sold

 

Leonardo da Vinci, Salvator Mundi, c.1500, Oil on walnut

Leonardo da Vinci, Salvator Mundi, c.1500, Oil on walnut

Willem de Kooning, Interchange, 1955, Oil on canvas

Willem de Kooning, Interchange, 1955, Oil on canvas

Jackson Pollock, Number 17A, 1948, Oil on fiberboard

Jackson Pollock, Number 17A, 1948, Oil on fiberboard

Paul Cezanne, Card Players, 1892/93, Oil on canvas

Paul Cezanne, Card Players, 1892/93, Oil on canvas

Paul Gauguin, When Will You Marry?, 1892, Oil on canvas

Paul Gauguin, When Will You Marry?, 1892, Oil on canvas

Mark Rothko, No. 6 (Violet, Green and Red), 1951, Oil on canvas

Mark Rothko, No. 6 (Violet, Green, and Red), 1951, Oil on canvas

Rembrandt, Pendant portraits of Maerten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit, 1634, Oil on canvas

Rembrandt, Pendant portraits of Maerten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit, 1634, Oil on canvas

Pablo Picasso, Les Femmes d'Alger (English: The Women of Algiers), 1955, Oil on canvas

Pablo Picasso, Les Femmes d’Alger (English: The Women of Algiers), 1955, Oil on canvas

Amedeo Modigliani, Nu couché (also known in English as Red Nude), 1917, Oil on canvas

Amedeo Modigliani, Nu couché (also known in English as Red Nude), 1917, Oil on canvas

Roy Lichtenstein, Masteripiece, 1962

Roy Lichtenstein, Masterpiece, 1962

Most of these artists had no idea their works would appreciate these values or become as important in the art world because, until the artist’s death, they were producing the art. Once it became known that there would be no more work produced by the artist, the body of work they created during their life became increasingly more valuable over time. Unlike the known artists and their valuable works of art, the art of the hand-woven Oriental rug comes from the hands many different artistan, hand spinning wool, master dayers, master designers, master weavers and looms of many unknown artists who will remain anonymous while their works of art will live on.

Photo by: Hasan Fathian

Photo by: Hasan Fathian

With Oriental rugs, it is the entire art itself that is dying. There will be no more artists left to create these rare works of hand-made art. Prices are already beginning to soar as more and more investors become aware of the rarity of these rugs and the eventual death of this art form. When hand-woven rugs cease to be produced, the existing body of work will soar in value beyond everyone’s expectations.

Smart investors can see their window of opportunity is closing fast and that Oriental rugs produced by past and current artists will not be replaced. This once unknown art is now becoming known, especially throughout the investment community. In painting, there was one artist, one canvas, and paint. With Oriental rugs, it takes the hands of many artists to create a masterpiece. It takes artists to make the wool and dye as well. The supply will continue to diminish and the price of authentic Oriental rugs will continue to climb. It is time to move your money if you are an investor that is interested in protecting wealth and less risky investments. The appreciation in these works of art is assured to increase in value and importance because all of these Artisans are dying off and sadly they are not being replaced. Here are some recent examples of prices from the famous auctioneers at Sotheby’s and Christie’s for some of these hand-woven works of art.

 

For a Kerman rug, from the Safavid period, known as Sickle-leaf sold recently at Sotheby’s auction for over $2m

For a Kerman rug, from the Safavid period, known as Sickle-leaf sold recently at Sotheby’s auction for over $2m

Another example of a silk Persian Kerman rug from the Safavid period sold at Christie’s auction for $4. 45m and it was created by anonymous artists

Another example of a silk Persian Kerman rug from the Safavid period sold at Christie’s auction for $4. 45m and it was created by anonymous artists

Some Persian rugs are doubling in value in a just a single year. Recently a 17th century Persian Laver Kirman rug received a record bid of $9.59m at auction doubling the previous record. Antique rugs are appreciating at astronomical values and in the last few years, even some of the newer, finer rugs have tripled and quadrupled in value. With the decline in production and the expansion of the global economy, prices for these hand-woven pieces of art by anonymous artisans will continue to astonish the world. There is no better place to invest money now than in the appreciating world of authentic Oriental rugs. A tremendous return on investment is literally assured for these hand-woven masterpieces.

The world’s most expensive rug is this silk Isfahan rug measuring 7 ft. 7 in. x 5 ft. 7 in. which was sold by Christie’s in 2008 for a staggering price tag of US $4,450,000. There were several factors that contributed to this record price. Some of these factors are exceptionally high knot density, use of numerous colors, outstanding craftsmanship and the use of pure silk. Additionally, despite its age the rug was in very good condition with negligible end loss at the time of the sale. A significant fact about the sale price is that this price is not just the highest ever paid for a rug at an auction but also the highest amongst private rug sales.

 

With a sale price of US $182,500, the honor of the second most expensive rug goes to a Ziegler Mahal rug from central Persia. Factors that contributed to the high price of this rug were its excellent condition, its large print scale and its attractive palette of colors including light blue and terracotta. The rug measures approximately 18’ 6” x 10’ 9”.

The third spot on the list of most expensive rugs goes to another Ziegler Mahal rug with a sale price of US $170,500. Measuring roughly 416 square feet, this rug’s striking factors are generous size and attractive, soft colored color tones, which is quite unique in Mahal rugs.

 

The fourth most expensive rug is this brightly colored, compact Ushak rug measuring 4’10” x 3’11”. Steeped in symbolism, this design-rich rug sold for US$158,500.

The fourth most expensive rug is this brightly colored, compact Ushak rug measuring 4’10” x 3’11”. Steeped in symbolism, this design-rich rug sold for US$158,500.

5th most expensive rug in the world

This Isfahan rug measuring 16’1” x 6’ 11” was ranked as the 5th most expensive rug in the world with a sale price of US $116,500 ranked it as the 5th most expensive rug in the world. The factors that helped increase the value of the rug are its pleasing color combinations, intricate pattern design,and high decorative value.

 

Ziegler Mahal rug

The fact that yet another Ziegler Mahal rug made it into the top 10 list of most expensive rugs is a testimony to the high quality and the value of these types of rugs. Measuring 20’ 6” x 17’ and featuring deep royal colors and an elaborately patterned floral border, this Ziegler Mahal rug fetched US $98,500 at a Sotheby’s auction.

 Mohtashem Kashan carpet from central Persia is the 7th most expensive rug in the world

This Mohtashem Kashan carpet from central Persia is the 7th most expensive rug in the world. It was sold by Sotheby’s for $92,500. The excellent craftsmanship and execution coupled with its intricate designing and beautifully combined colors give this rug its highly decorative value.

Portuguese Armorial rug

With a sale price of US$80,500, this Portuguese Armorial rug earned the 8th position on the list of most expensive rugs. The rug measures 19’5” x 14’10” and features a single, central square medallion with an intricate border comprised of repeated oscillating patterns.

Fereghan rug

At 9th rank is this Fereghan rug with a price tag of US $74,500. Measuring 18’9” x 13’8”, this rug is representative of a typical Fereghan Sarouk design, which is highly favored by the majority of collectors.

Tabriz rug

Rounding off the top ten list is this Tabriz rug, which was sold by Sotheby’s for US $68,500. Originating from northwest Persia, this rug is a great example of traditional Mahi field patterns and colors. The rug measures 26’6” x 18ft3” and has an elaborate all-over repetitive pattern. Its border features striking turtle shell design elements that are highly appreciated and add additional value to the rug.

 

LOUISVILLE, KY: 11300 Decimal Dr. Suite C Louisville, KY 40299

(502)327-1499

LEXINGTON, KY: 2051 Richmond Rd. Suite#125 Lexington, KY 40502

(859)272-490

www.khazairugcleaning.com

 

Rug Appraisal

Rug Appraisal

RUG APPRAISALS

We regularly prepare rug appraisals for rugs. Rug appraisals meet a wide array of needs, including insurance purposes, collateral loan agreements, and charitable contributions. Your rugs are described in detail, which includes origin, design, condition, construction, dimensions, age, and retail replacement value. The final legal document signed personally by Mr. David Khazai and is accepted throughout the industry by courts, estate planning professionals, the Internal Revenue Service, and insurance firms. Within one or two days the certified appraisal document will be given to you.

 

 

FIVE GENERATIONS OF EXPERIENCE

Over the last 20 years, we have been doing rug appraisals in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Naples, Florida; Dayton, Ohio; Cabo St. Lucus, Mexico; Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky; Nashville, Tennessee and partnerships in Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Illinois and Seattle, Washington. We closed these stores to work on click and brick and to serve the Kentucky area exclusively.

We offer three ways to get your rug appraisal. You can come to our facility and bring your rugs to be appraised. This can be done at the same time your rugs are being cleaned or repaired. You can also send us a full picture of your rugs along with a close-up of the back, and the exact measurement of the rug and we will e-mail you a certified rug appraisal from our expert, David Khazai. If you would prefer we come to your home, we can do that also and do your rug appraisal on-site.

Our Rug Appraisal Certificate is a written appraisal where we document each rug, note the origin, category, type or regional area as well as the construction, materials and condition, age or in what circa your rug was made along with any other specifics. We include a photo, a description of the design, colors, and age along with other information, depending on your needs. David bases the valuation on the current replacement value. A separate computer generated page for each rug is also provided. We keep digital photos, notes and a digital copy of the rug appraisal so a new original copy can be produced for you if needed in the future. For your security, all of the appraisal work is kept in our office.

 

appraisal

Rug Appraisal

To get a rug appraisal right away, call us at 1-502-219-6959 in Louisville and 1-859-592-5949 in Lexington. If you prefer, please leave a message and we will get back to you right away.